July 28, 2014

eldritchcuddle replied to your photoset “today’s a femme day apparently?”

BEAUTIFUL ALIEN BOY (srsly these photos are great)

<33 thank youu this is all i aspire to be

1:38pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDhCax1MldCPR
  
Filed under: eldritchcuddle 
July 28, 2014

thrandilf:

snapchats from agent maria hill

(via mooserrific)

11:38am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDhCax1Ml1ezl
  
Filed under: pERFECT 
July 28, 2014

today’s a femme day apparently?

July 27, 2014

eldritchcuddle replied to your post “thislousytshirt replied to your post “i have the same social security…”

i……… i still have no idea what’s happening *stares*

lmfao i’m so sorry i don’t know how to explain this

i can’t find the scene on youtube! it’s from the first iron man movie—oh wait i found a sound clip? how archaic

July 27, 2014

it’s raining outside and i feel amazing

July 27, 2014

thislousytshirt replied to your post “i have the same social security number as tony stark”

what

eldritchcuddle replied to your post “i have the same social security number as tony stark”

OMFG

hardly-questionable replied to your post “i have the same social security number as tony stark”

how do you even know this

it’s FIVE, you guys, five! i’m laughing so hard

i think all of us with fives should get together and—wait for it—

high five

July 26, 2014

i finally watched that #likeagirl ad and i actually fucking cried what the fuck

July 26, 2014

#a shipwreck of love and ambition seeking refuge among the rocks that shattered him  #(and I do believe he wasn’t intending to ally with Beckett; not at first  #he was just useless and drunken and signed on because why the fuck not)  #just…look at the way that he looks at her  #that is not a look of unrequited love; that is not even bitterness over spurned love  #that is the look of a man who is so far past losing everything that he can only laugh  #(what’s one more bullet wound when you’ve already bled out?)  #potc is about the ways people become pirates—and it’s always wanting that drives them there  #wanting love wanting freedom wanting a ship wanting glory wanting wealth wanting and wanting and wanting  #piracy is about the ability to chase that wanting; to cut the corners and simply aim yourself at what you desire  #Jack’s compass natch)  #but how do you stride for the horizon in a shipwreck? you’re left with just the wanting  #and the wanting kills  #and that’s what Commodore Norrington here is about (notbecauseofvictories)

#a shipwreck of love and ambition seeking refuge among the rocks that shattered him  #(and I do believe he wasn’t intending to ally with Beckett; not at first  #he was just useless and drunken and signed on because why the fuck not)  #just…look at the way that he looks at her  #that is not a look of unrequited love; that is not even bitterness over spurned love  #that is the look of a man who is so far past losing everything that he can only laugh  #(what’s one more bullet wound when you’ve already bled out?)  #potc is about the ways people become pirates—and it’s always wanting that drives them there  #wanting love wanting freedom wanting a ship wanting glory wanting wealth wanting and wanting and wanting  #piracy is about the ability to chase that wanting; to cut the corners and simply aim yourself at what you desire  #Jack’s compass natch)  #but how do you stride for the horizon in a shipwreck? you’re left with just the wanting  #and the wanting kills  #and that’s what Commodore Norrington here is about (notbecauseofvictories)

(Source: marlassinger, via mooserrific)

July 26, 2014
jumpingjacktrash:

neurosciencestuff:

Stress tied to change in children’s gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health
Children who have been abused or neglected early in life are at risk for developing both emotional and physical health problems. In a new study, scientists have found that maltreatment affects the way genes are activated, which has implications for children’s long-term development. Previous studies focused on how a particular child’s individual characteristics and genetics interacted with that child’s experiences in an effort to understand how health problems emerge. In the new study, researchers were able to measure the degree to which genes were turned “on” or “off” through a biochemical process called methylation. This new technique reveals the ways that nurture changes nature—that is, how our social experiences can change the underlying biology of our genes.
The study, from researchers at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, appears in the journal Child Development. Nearly 1 million children in the United States are neglected or abused every year.
The researchers found an association between the kind of parenting children had and a particular gene (called the glucocorticoid receptor gene) that’s responsible for crucial aspects of social functioning and health. Not all genes are active at all times. DNA methylation is one of several biochemical mechanisms that cells use to control whether genes are turned on or off. The researchers examined DNA methylation in the blood of 56 children ages 11 to 14. Half of the children had been physically abused.
They found that compared to the children who hadn’t been maltreated, the maltreated children had increased methylation on several sites of the glucocorticoid receptor gene, also known as NR3C1, echoing the findings of earlier studies of rodents. In this study, the effect occurred on the section of the gene that’s critical for nerve growth factor, which is an important part of healthy brain development.
There were no differences in the genes that the children were born with, the study found; instead, the differences were seen in the extent to which the genes had been turned on or off. “This link between early life stress and changes in genes may uncover how early childhood experiences get under the skin and confer lifelong risk,” notes Seth D. Pollak, professor of psychology and pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who directed the study.
Previous studies have shown that children who have experienced physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect are more likely to develop mood, anxiety, and aggressive disorders, as well as to have problems regulating their emotions. These problems, in turn, can disrupt relationships and affect school performance. Maltreated children are also at risk for chronic health problems such as cardiac disease and cancer. The current study helps explain why these childhood experiences can affect health years later.
The gene identified by the researchers affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rodents. Disruptions of this system in the brain would make it difficult for people to regulate their emotional behavior and stress levels. Circulating through the body in the blood, this gene affects the immune system, leaving individuals less able to fight off germs and more vulnerable to illnesses.
"Our finding that children who were physically maltreated display a specific change to the glucocorticoid receptor gene could explain why abused children have more emotional difficulties as they age," according to Pollak. "They may have fewer glucocorticoid receptors in their brains, which would impair the brain’s stress-response system and result in problems regulating stress."
The findings have implications for designing more effective interventions for children, especially since studies of animals indicate that the effects of poor parenting on gene methylation may be reversible if caregiving improves. The study also adds to what we know about how child maltreatment relates to changes in the body and mind, findings that were summarized recently in an SRCD Social Policy Report by Sara R. Jaffee and Cindy W. Christian.

being bullied, abused, scapegoated, and neglected in school crippled my brain’s reward mechanism. despite having responsible, supportive parents, i was permanently damaged by that experience. medicating my anxiety and depression helps a lot, but it will still always be there. bullying is a form of child abuse. emotional cruelty from authority figures is a form of child abuse. this shit is real.
a society that’s happy to sprain itself bending over backwards to make sure kids don’t see sex on tv is willing to accept kids’ minds being permanently scarred in school. i just don’t understand.

^^ this. jesus, i read so much porn as a teenager, and nothing came of it but a larger vocabulary and more comfort with myself. social isolation, though? if anything fucked me up, it was years of that.

jumpingjacktrash:

neurosciencestuff:

Stress tied to change in children’s gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health

Children who have been abused or neglected early in life are at risk for developing both emotional and physical health problems. In a new study, scientists have found that maltreatment affects the way genes are activated, which has implications for children’s long-term development. Previous studies focused on how a particular child’s individual characteristics and genetics interacted with that child’s experiences in an effort to understand how health problems emerge. In the new study, researchers were able to measure the degree to which genes were turned “on” or “off” through a biochemical process called methylation. This new technique reveals the ways that nurture changes nature—that is, how our social experiences can change the underlying biology of our genes.

The study, from researchers at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, appears in the journal Child Development. Nearly 1 million children in the United States are neglected or abused every year.

The researchers found an association between the kind of parenting children had and a particular gene (called the glucocorticoid receptor gene) that’s responsible for crucial aspects of social functioning and health. Not all genes are active at all times. DNA methylation is one of several biochemical mechanisms that cells use to control whether genes are turned on or off. The researchers examined DNA methylation in the blood of 56 children ages 11 to 14. Half of the children had been physically abused.

They found that compared to the children who hadn’t been maltreated, the maltreated children had increased methylation on several sites of the glucocorticoid receptor gene, also known as NR3C1, echoing the findings of earlier studies of rodents. In this study, the effect occurred on the section of the gene that’s critical for nerve growth factor, which is an important part of healthy brain development.

There were no differences in the genes that the children were born with, the study found; instead, the differences were seen in the extent to which the genes had been turned on or off. “This link between early life stress and changes in genes may uncover how early childhood experiences get under the skin and confer lifelong risk,” notes Seth D. Pollak, professor of psychology and pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who directed the study.

Previous studies have shown that children who have experienced physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect are more likely to develop mood, anxiety, and aggressive disorders, as well as to have problems regulating their emotions. These problems, in turn, can disrupt relationships and affect school performance. Maltreated children are also at risk for chronic health problems such as cardiac disease and cancer. The current study helps explain why these childhood experiences can affect health years later.

The gene identified by the researchers affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rodents. Disruptions of this system in the brain would make it difficult for people to regulate their emotional behavior and stress levels. Circulating through the body in the blood, this gene affects the immune system, leaving individuals less able to fight off germs and more vulnerable to illnesses.

"Our finding that children who were physically maltreated display a specific change to the glucocorticoid receptor gene could explain why abused children have more emotional difficulties as they age," according to Pollak. "They may have fewer glucocorticoid receptors in their brains, which would impair the brain’s stress-response system and result in problems regulating stress."

The findings have implications for designing more effective interventions for children, especially since studies of animals indicate that the effects of poor parenting on gene methylation may be reversible if caregiving improves. The study also adds to what we know about how child maltreatment relates to changes in the body and mind, findings that were summarized recently in an SRCD Social Policy Report by Sara R. Jaffee and Cindy W. Christian.

being bullied, abused, scapegoated, and neglected in school crippled my brain’s reward mechanism. despite having responsible, supportive parents, i was permanently damaged by that experience. medicating my anxiety and depression helps a lot, but it will still always be there. bullying is a form of child abuse. emotional cruelty from authority figures is a form of child abuse. this shit is real.

a society that’s happy to sprain itself bending over backwards to make sure kids don’t see sex on tv is willing to accept kids’ minds being permanently scarred in school. i just don’t understand.

^^ this. jesus, i read so much porn as a teenager, and nothing came of it but a larger vocabulary and more comfort with myself. social isolation, though? if anything fucked me up, it was years of that.

July 26, 2014

i have the same social security number as tony stark

3:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDhCax1MahuyX
  
Filed under: iron man 
July 26, 2014
theopteryx:

out of all of the amazing fanart in this fandom i think my favorites are the ones where bucky looks like he’s stolen everyone else’s clothes and dgafffff 

theopteryx:

out of all of the amazing fanart in this fandom i think my favorites are the ones where bucky looks like he’s stolen everyone else’s clothes and dgafffff 

July 26, 2014

(Source: cathallyc, via fuckyeahguyskissing)

July 25, 2014

crocobaby:

Do you think every president goes through a awkward first few weeks in office when they’re not sure when’s the right time to ask if aliens are real or not?

(via queercap)

July 25, 2014
roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

July 25, 2014
http://baeddeltrender.tumblr.com/post/92767885157/bathrobehugs-baeddeltrender

bathrobehugs:

baeddeltrender:

bathrobehugs:

~ snip (discussion of transmisogyny, sj talk)

Read More

5:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZDhCax1MVnl6d
  
Filed under: tumblr sj